Responsibility-driven collective action in the context of rapid rural depopulation

Liu, P, Zhao, Y, Ravenscroft, N and Harder, M (2020) Responsibility-driven collective action in the context of rapid rural depopulation. Journal of Rural Studies, 75 (1). pp. 48-56. ISSN 0743-0167

[img]
Preview
Text
pre proof print responsibility CA.pdf - Submitted Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives.

Download (247kB) | Preview
[img] Text
20191218 Collective action.docx - Accepted Version
Restricted to Repository staff only until 7 March 2022.
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives.

Download (92kB) | Request a copy

Abstract

China has witnessed unprecedented and rapid urbanization which has led to the depopulation and structural collapse of many traditional rural village communities, and the decline of many collective functions such as the effective management of the public realm. In seeking to address this problem it is clear from the literature that there is considerable potential in catalyzing collective action, particularly where there is a moral imperative to act and the availability of leaders with the ability to organize the collective. However, while there is evidence that community-based collective action has provided effective localized solution pathways for managing collective goods when the focus has been on the distribution of benefits, there is little evidence about its potential in scenarios associated with the distribution of costs, or responsibilities. In addressing this asymmetry, we present a case study of a typical village near Shanghai which has successfully established a community based environmental management system, and describe the process, characteristics and influencing factors of its responsibility- centered collective action. Our findings show that smart local leadership, an effective organizing strategy, and involvement of a suitable ‘core group’ was crucial. The strategy of mobilizing this core group, of empowering them with decision-making rights, and supporting their volunteered role as a ‘bridge and platform’ connecting the village cadres and villagers, significantly reduced the enforcement and monitoring costs, controlled free rider problems, and gained public support and participation, leading to a stable and sustainable solution. Our findings illustrate specific principles that apply to many cases in China, and general principles that are likely to be applicable more widely.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Supplementary data related to this article can be found at https:// doi.org/10.1016/j.jrurstud.2020.02.008.
Keywords: Distribution of responsibility Rural depopulation Collective action Rural environmental management Elderly party member
Divisions: Real Estate and Land Management
Depositing User: Professor Neil Ravenscroft
Date Deposited: 24 Mar 2020 15:03
Last Modified: 17 Apr 2020 13:13
URI: http://rau.repository.guildhe.ac.uk/id/eprint/16389

Actions (login required)

Edit Item Edit Item