“Bagels and doughnuts … round food for every mood” food advertising discourses

Maddock, Sarah and Hill, Beverley (2016) “Bagels and doughnuts … round food for every mood” food advertising discourses. British Food Journal, 118 (2). pp. 327-342. ISSN 0007-070X

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Abstract

Purpose – The relationship between food and mood has been discussed for many years. This paper aims to extend that debate by exploring how food advertising, a key source of consumer information about food, utilises and implies varied associations between food and mood. Design/methodology/approach – The research combines a textually oriented analysis with an analysis of the visual images in a sample of typical food advertisements drawn from women’s magazines. Findings –Although healthy foods have the potential to enhance mood this is not often used as a key advertising message. Conversely, advertisements for foods that can depress mood frequently adopt messages of happiness and wellbeing. Research limitations/implications – This exploratory research provides an initial investigation of advertising discourses of food and mood at a snap shot in time. Based on the findings derived from this limited sample, further research is suggested which would provide a more comprehensive survey of food advertising. Practical implications – The research is of value to food promoters in suggesting that they review food messages and the use of emotional appeals in the light of developing scientific research on the link between food and mental wellbeing. Social implications – The growing interest in promoting mental-health and wellbeing means that consumers and governments are keen to understand the relationship between food and mood and its potential influence on consumer food choices. Originality/value – Existing debate has focused on scientific or socio-cultural knowledge of the relationship between food and mood. There is less research available on whether an association between food and mood is suggested in food advertising. This paper addresses that gap and finds that further research is warranted.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Promotion, mood, food, mental health and wellbeing, advertising appeals
Divisions: Business and Entrepreneurship
Depositing User: Dr Beverley Hill
Date Deposited: 17 Jul 2020 08:46
Last Modified: 17 Jul 2020 08:46
URI: http://rau.repository.guildhe.ac.uk/id/eprint/16407

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